Advent 2- Peace

“A voice cries out: “In the wilderness prepare the way of the Lord, make straight in the desert a highway for our God. Every valley shall be lifted up, and every mountain and hill be made low; the uneven ground shall become level, and the rough places a plain.” Isaiah 40:3-4

What’s alive in you?

What’s alive in us collectively that we may not even realize is alive?

Peace

The holidays, even more so this year, are a time when it can be difficult to feel what is alive in us. We remember the past, we lament what is broken. Broken relationships, threats of war, marginalization of others, unmet expectations, and promises that never came to be become magnified during this time of year. Specifically this year, the eclipse of the light by the darkness seems more prevalent.

The ancient people of Jerusalem know these feelings. They had been conquered by the Babylonians, removed from their homeland. The blame game was strong. Some blamed God, others blamed another, and a few blamed themselves. Their is doubt, fear, and anxiety that they will never seen their homeland again. This is wilderness, where life is hard to sense.

Isaiah has great nerve. The spirit of the Lord speaks through the prophet and  has the nerve to speak words of peace, words of life. Take comfort, because the way of the Lord is being cleared for you at this very moment. In scripture, the wilderness is often where peace begins. It’s the place where transformation- personal and communal- begins. The way to God almost often takes one to the desert. Peace begins in the wilderness.

What if we lived each day during this Advent season not lamenting what is broken, but sensing what is alive in us? What if we lived knowing that a way, a way in which God’s light will be revealed anew. is coming?

What’s alive in you?

What’s alive in us?

 

Advent 1- Hope

Come, house of Jacob let’s walk by the Lord’s light. Isaiah 2:5
 
One of my new favorite songs of the season is “A Light” by the Brilliance. The chorus goes like this, “Peace to all this night. A hope and light shine bright.”
Hope-candle
As we enter into this season of Advent that leads us to Christmas, we are seeking to find peace.  Peace in our personal lives.  Peace in our communal lives.  We lament that which seeks to tear us apart in this day and age. Many of us may be worried about Christmas gatherings that include family and friends who think and believe differently than we do.
Isaiah is writing during a fractured time in Israel’s history. The prophet seems to be writing encouragement towards a future time, but is actually calling on the people to look in the proverbial mirror now. God’s peace and justice are not for a far off time, but for a time such as this.
As we enter into the season of Advent, perhaps it is time for us to closely examine our own lives.  Are we the type of people who radiate a light that draws people towards God and God’s ways?  Madeline L’Engle offers this for us; “We do not draw people to Christ by loudly discrediting what they believe, by telling them how wrong they are and how right we are, but by showing them a light that is so lovely that they want with all their hearts to know the source of it.”
Isaiah had deep trust in the people of his time and that trust remains today.  We are not only called, but equipped to walk in the light of the Lord. It is simply who God has created us to be.  During this Advent season, may we each fully embrace this reality.